A Metaphysical & Ethical Cross-Examination Of Islam and Stoicism

A Metaphysical & Ethical Cross-Examination Of Islam and Stoicism

Islam is an Abrahamic faith based on the oneness of God and the prophethood of Muhammad (PBUH). As with most religions, Islam encompasses metaphysical, ethical and judicial tenets. The Quran is its religious scripture, which Muslims believe to be the direct word of God. Stoicism, on the other hand, is an ancient Greek school of philosophy founded by Zeno of Citium. The primary focus of the school was ethics and virtue, which they believed was derived from knowledge and reason. 

What unites the two is the belief that ultimately the goodness and happiness of a person’s life is not dependent on their external surroundings, or as the Stoic philosopher and emperor Marcus Aurelius once wrote, “Misfortune, borne nobly, is good fortune.”[1] In both Islam and Stoicism, this outlook is the result of metaphysical beliefs impacting a person’s view of the world and the way that they interact with it. However, taken at face value, the metaphysical principles of Islam and Stoicism are remarkably different. This begs the question, how can two distinctly different metaphysical viewpoints result in the same practical viewpoint? 

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Deconstructing Karl Popper’s Paradox of Intolerance

Deconstructing Karl Popper’s Paradox of Intolerance

Racism. Sexism. Xenophobia. These problems have plagued humanity since time immemorial and there’s no sign that they’re going away anytime soon. Despite these problems, I choose to believe that the majority of people are decent human beings who inherently desire to live in a tolerant society.

An integral aspect of a tolerant society is people’s ability to have and promote differing viewpoints i.e. freedom of speech. However to declare such freedoms as unlimited is to give unsavory voices a place at the table.

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I Think, Therefore, I Am: Rene Descartes’ Cogito Argument Explained

I Think, Therefore, I Am: Rene Descartes’ Cogito Argument Explained

How do we prove something beyond reasonable doubt? We use empirical evidence, corroborate eyewitness accounts and analyze the information that we are given. Most of the tools that we utilize in order to prove that something is beyond reasonable doubt ultimately necessitate the use of our senses, i.e. sight, smell, taste, touch and hearing. This then produces the question, are our senses to be trusted? What can we be certain of without the senses? These questions form the basis of Rene Descartes’ Cogito Argument, which ultimately results in the famous saying, “I think, therefore, I am.”

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